REGULARITY EXPLAINED: RACING YOURSELF AND THE CLOCK

REGULARITY COMPETITION, a unique form of Motorsport that pits competitors against their own driving and the clock, will feature as a major part of this weekend’s Bathurst Motor Festival at Mount Panorama.

In a first for a major Event on the Mountain, two regularity classes made up of more than 80 vehicles – out of a total of 271 entered – will compete this weekend and will be made up by an astonishing variety of different makes and models of vehicle.

The Road Racing club of New South Wales will be joined by the Porsche Club of NSW in two separate regularity classes, joining the five racing categories also set to tackle the mountain this weekend.

Regularity is a form of Motorsport where outright speed and pure lap times have no bearing on the overall results.

In regularity competition, entrants will nominate a benchmark time following practice. That competitor will then aim to get as close as possible, or maintain, that nominated time in a series of runs following the practice session.

Penalty points are awarded for each tenth of a second competitors are away from, or of they lap quicker than, their nominated time. Therefore the driver with the least number of points at the conclusion of an Event will win and the person with the most will finish last.

So, even if a competitor sets the slowest time imaginable he or she could still win the weekend by lapping consistently at their nominated benchmark – be it 2m50s or 2m10s.

Regularity competition is designed to open up the sport to newcomers, or competitors who might not have the budget or machinery to race in a fully-blown racing environment.

Because there is no wheel-to-wheel racing, cars are not required to have roll cages - though each must carry appropriate fire extinguishers, emergency ‘kill’ switches and drivers must, naturally, wear helmets and head-to-toe clothing whilst on track.

40 cars have been nominated for the Porsche Club of NSW Regularity, ranging from the humble Porsche Cayenne SUV to turbocharged GT2 and 944 varieties – and just about everything else in between in what is sure to be a Porsche lovers playground.

The NSW Road Racing Club’s field is even more diverse thanks to an entry list that represents 18 different brands.

The more exciting cars include Mitsubishi Lancer Evo’s, Hatchback Torana’s and open-topped Clubmans – but the beauty of regularity competition is that a little Renault Clio or Suzuki Swift has every chance of tasting the champagne at the end of the weekend.

Bathurst Motor Festival promoter James O’Brien said introducing the regularity classes into the Event allowed it to reach a much broader range of competitors.

“The whole concept of the Bathurst Motor Festival is to allow people to get onto Mount Panorama who otherwise may never have the opportunity,” he explained.

“Track time at Bathurst is a hard thing to come by, so when we offered these regularity classes an opportunity to be part of the Event they jumped at it – and that enthusiasm has been reflected in the large competitor numbers they have been able to attract.

“It’s pleasing from an Event standpoint to give these classes an opportunity to be part of the Event, and it’s great so see them embrace it.”

Both the Porsche Club of NSW and NSW Road Racing Clubs will have a series of regularity ‘sessions’ throughout the Friday, Saturday and Sunday of the Bathurst Motor Festival Event – with practice kicking off the on-track action first thing Friday morning.

The Bathurst Motor Festival program features Practice and Qualifying on Friday (April 22) prior to 15 races and 6 regularity time-trial sessions on Saturday and Sunday, April 23-24.

The Bathurst Motor Festival will be held at Mount Panorama on April 22-24 and will feature a range of diverse racing and regularity categories, including the Aussie Racing Cars, Commodore Cup, NSW Production Sports Cars, Formula Ford 1600 and Saloon Cars, plus two regularity classes from the Porsche Club of NSW and the NSW Road Racing Club.

Entry to the Bathurst Motor Festival will be by ‘bank note’ donation – anything from $5 upwards – with proceeds going directly to the Cancer Council of New South Wales and their Relay for Life program.

Multiple positions for Event Volunteers are still available with information available via the Event website.